Pan Country Park

Pan Country Park

Created as part of the Pan Meadows development this exciting new country park provides a mixture of habitats stretching round the boundary of the urban area. It includes wild meadows, a network of streams, edible hedgerows, an orchard and a man-made pond.

How to get there

On foot/By bike – The country park can be accessed at various points throughout Pan Meadows. Access at the south end of the park is from Pan Lane via bridleway N40, from the north is via Staplers/Long Lane.

By bus – Long Lane Stop (Routes 8/9). (Bus Timetables)

By Car – At the north of the Country Park there is no car park nearby and on-street parking is limited. There are a small number of parking spaces off of Pan Lane for the south end. Approximate code for your sat nav is PO30 2PJ.

Access

Access through the park is primarily on grass paths which can be muddy in places, though sections of the park have roads and surfaced paths adjacent.

What to look out for

The Country Park is mainly grassy meadow and woodland. You’ll also find a few other surprises. there is an orchard planted with fruit trees which produce some edible fruit in the late summer, so do help yourself! Further in the little pond at the back of Pond Walk is a great place to sit and watch dragonflies, and there are also three secret streams to cross – there are bridges of course as sometimes they are not so secret when it has been raining!

Wildlife here is typical of urban fringe countryside. In the open areas you can often see buzzards, kestrels and sparrowhawks hunting, and nearer the wooded stream corridors look out for woodpeckers, jays and smaller birds like tits, robins and wrens. In the long meadow grass at the end of the summer look out for our most impressive resident creature, the harmless but spectacular Wasp Spider!

Argiope bruennichi, the wasp spider

Argiope bruennichi, the wasp spider

Managing the site

Management of the park has included the planting of more than 16,000 trees including hundreds of special elm trees that are resistant to Dutch elm disease, installation of bridges and upgrading of paths. Work continues to create and maintain this new country park.

Get Involved

There are various ways you can help improve and maintain our sites. We rely on conservation volunteers to help with many tasks and also need people who are happy to regular visit the site be our “eyes and ears”, this means we can respond much quicker to issues. Find out more here.

You can also help by becoming one of our regular supporters. Even giving a few pounds each month can make a real difference, with your donation being invested into site management and improvement work to benefit site visitors and look after our precious wildlife. Sign up here.